No One Home

Written by Tim Weaver

Review written by Andrew Hill

A former Customs and Police Officer, Andrew Hill is just putting the finishing touches to the first book in a crime series set in the New Forest, where he lived for 30 years. An avid reader across the crime genre and regular at Crimefest, he now lives in West Sussex and works in property.


No One Home
Penguin Michael Joseph
RRP: £8.99
Released: February 20 2020
PBK

When the occupants of three neighbouring houses (and an adjoining farmhouse) in Yorkshire go missing on Halloween; the Police investigation reveals no clues as to what happened.

Over two years later, no one is any closer to an answer. The houses stand empty; the owner’s belongings and their cars remain on driveways. One of the missing couple’s sons has called in missing person expert David Raker.

A second narrative strand comes from California, and the past. Detective Joline Kader, of the Los Angeles Sheriff Department, has been called to a murder scene. She finds a body that has been part-dissolved in acid.

Tim Weaver is aptly named, as he constructs a complex and contorted dual location and dual timeline story that is delightfully involving and tightly written. The two main protagonists are well-drawn, sympathetic, yet driven. I found myself lured into the two narrative-strands, looking for convergence, yet not finding one. Such is the craft of this storyteller. Instead, Weaver, knits a series of questions for the reader to ponder upon.

What is the involvement of the Yorkshire ‘legal’ firm of Seiger & Sten?

What connects the Yorkshire families, other than being neighbours?

Why is the more than capable Detective Kader been given cases that no one else wants?

Where does the disappearance of Beatrix Steard fit into the jigsaw?

Who is Bryan Kennedy?

Is there even a connection between two cases that are separated by time, location and modus operandi?

The gentle pace that the author initiates is measured. However, there is a gathering of momentum as the tale progresses making the reader turn the pages at an increasing (and impatient) rate. The conclusions appear, only to find that they led into a cul-de-sac of wrong suppositions.

This is the tenth David Raker mystery - a cleverly paced, engaging and a superior read in a quintessential series of crime novels.



Home
Book Reviews
Features
Interviews
News
Columns
Authors
Blog
About Us
Contact Us

Privacy Policy | Contact Shots Editor

THIS WEBSITE IS © SHOTS COLLECTIVE. NOT TO BE REPRODUCED ELECTRONICALLY EITHER WHOLLY OR IN PART WITHOUT PRIOR PERMISSION OF THE EDITOR.